DA seeks release of “important” reports

1995

South Africa‘s main Parliamentary opposition party, the Democratic Alliance (DA) says it will be using the Promotion of Action to Information Act and other mechanisms to release to the public a number of reports it says are of national importance.

It says the reports, including the 2001 Joint Investigating Team Report into the Strategic Defence Package, were either not released to the public; or were substantially rewritten or edited before being released; were not referred to Parliament to be debated and considered; or were ignored in that the findings or recommendations made in them have not been acted upon.

“We will therefore continue to use the mechanisms available to us such as the motions calling for debates in Parliament, parliamentary questions as well as our membership in parliamentary committees to ensure that these reports are no longer ignored and sidelined by the [ruling African National Congress],” DA parliamentary leader Athol Trollip said in a statement yesterday.   

“Significantly, most of these reports are compiled at great cost to the taxpayer, money that could have been used to deliver basic services. The DA will be submitting a series of parliamentary questions to determine how much each report cost and, given that they have been ignored, whether the relevant minister deems that cost justifiable.”

Among the reports are:

REPORT

PUBLISHED

GOVERNMENT ACTION

Joint Investigating Team Report

November 2001

The report that was tabled in Parliament was substantially edited by the Executive to remove critical pieces of evidence outlining irregularities in the acquisition process in the arms deal.

Van Zyl Slabbert Commission Report

March 2003

The recommendations made in the report for electoral reform have never come before Parliament to be debated and considered.

United Nations Report on the Oil- for-Food Programme

October 2005

The allegations contained in the report of payment of surcharges levelled against a number of South African entities involved in the oil-for-food programme have not been investigated by Government or come before Parliament to be debated or considered.

African Peer Review Mechanism Report

July 2006

The report that was tabled in Parliament was substantially edited by the Executive to remove findings and recommendations made regarding service delivery failures, the centralisation of executive power and the weakening parliamentary oversight.

Ministerial Review Commission on Intelligence Report

September 2008

The report and its recommendations for tighter controls on the use of special powers in Intelligence has never come before Parliament to be debated or considered.

Report by retired military-generals on political violence in Zimbabwe

around June 2008



A report on post-election violence in Zimbabwe has never been released by the Executive and has never come before Parliament to be debated or considered.