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South African defence industry should look more to supplying security services – NDIC

SA defence industry should look to the security servicesFacing a future devoid of large scale defence acquisitions, South Africa’s defence industry should look to meeting the requirements of other security services and agencies, a draft National Defence Industry Council (NDIC) strategy document says.

The document points out the evolution of both armed conflict and criminal enterprise demands “increasingly close co-operation among the armed forces, police, intelligence services and other security services and agencies”.

It points out this “argues for ensuring maximum practicable inter-operability among them” adding “some commonality of equipment and systems, particularly communications” would be good.

The more than 200 page document, which was discussed at a workshop held at Denel Land Systems last week, sees “real benefit in ensuring inter-operability among the data capture, fusion, analysis and dissemination technologies, particularly as the economies of scale that could result from co-operation in this field will enable South African industry to keep pace with the tremendous rate of development in these technologies”.

The document notes, importantly, there is potential to reduce overall cost to South Africa by “pursuing” common equipment and systems among the various services and agencies as long as it does not impair effectiveness or efficiency.

Indications are the Department of Defence and Military Veterans (DoDMV) is going to remain under financial pressure and constraints for the foreseeable future, admitted to by Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula during her budget vote address. This, the strategy document states, must be a starting point for the defence industry to examine how it can support other security services and agencies in South Africa, including the SA Police Service, the State Security Agency and the soon-to-become reality that will be known as the Border Management Authority (BMA).

The security sector must examine acquisition and procurement policies to ensure no unnecessary duplication of “development or manufacturing effort, or importing of equipment or supplies that could well be sourced locally”.

An added bonus is the export potential arising from acquisition and procurement co-operation to service South Africa’s various security agencies.

Taking the police as an example the document notes 11 areas where defence equipment could be applied to the various aspects of policing. They are command and control technologies; communications intelligence and cyber intelligence technologies; optical and electronic surveillance and exploitation technologies; data capture, fusion, analysis and dissemination technologies; weapons and ammunition; personal protective equipment; training simulation systems; unmanned vehicle technologies and vehicles for rural patrol work.

On the now Parliament approved Border Management Agency, the NDIC document sees it requiring inter-operability with both the defence force and the police as far as communications and control and command systems are concerned. The NDIC also sees the Department of Home Affairs’ new addition as needing radar, optical and other surveillance systems and related data capture, fusion, analysis and dissemination systems.

“These will be quite similar, certainly at the technology level, to those utilised by the defence force and police.”
South African defence industry should look more to supplying security services – NDIC

Facing a future devoid of large scale defence acquisitions, South Africa’s defence industry should look to meeting the requirements of other security services and agencies, a draft National Defence Industry Council (NDIC) strategy document says.

The document points out the evolution of both armed conflict and criminal enterprise demands “increasingly close co-operation among the armed forces, police, intelligence services and other security services and agencies”.

It points out this “argues for ensuring maximum practicable inter-operability among them” adding “some commonality of equipment and systems, particularly communications” would be good.

The more than 200 page document, which was discussed at a workshop held at Denel Land Systems last week, sees “real benefit in ensuring inter-operability among the data capture, fusion, analysis and dissemination technologies, particularly as the economies of scale that could result from co-operation in this field will enable South African industry to keep pace with the tremendous rate of development in these technologies”.

The document notes, importantly, there is potential to reduce overall cost to South Africa by “pursuing” common equipment and systems among the various services and agencies as long as it does not impair effectiveness or efficiency.

Indications are the Department of Defence and Military Veterans (DoDMV) is going to remain under financial pressure and constraints for the foreseeable future, admitted to by Minister Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula during her budget vote address. This, the strategy document states, must be a starting point for the defence industry to examine how it can support other security services and agencies in South Africa, including the SA Police Service, the State Security Agency and the soon-to-become reality that will be known as the Border Management Authority (BMA).

The security sector must examine acquisition and procurement policies to ensure no unnecessary duplication of “development or manufacturing effort, or importing of equipment or supplies that could well be sourced locally”.

An added bonus is the export potential arising from acquisition and procurement co-operation to service South Africa’s various security agencies.

Taking the police as an example the document notes 11 areas where defence equipment could be applied to the various aspects of policing. They are command and control technologies; communications intelligence and cyber intelligence technologies; optical and electronic surveillance and exploitation technologies; data capture, fusion, analysis and dissemination technologies; weapons and ammunition; personal protective equipment; training simulation systems; unmanned vehicle technologies and vehicles for rural patrol work.

On the now Parliament approved Border Management Agency, the NDIC document sees it requiring inter-operability with both the defence force and the police as far as communications and control and command systems are concerned. The NDIC also sees the Department of Home Affairs’ new addition as needing radar, optical and other surveillance systems and related data capture, fusion, analysis and dissemination systems.

“These will be quite similar, certainly at the technology level, to those utilised by the defence force and police.”
 

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